London, 17 Mar 2001.
For immediate release.

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Drivers Disappoint Council And Police
No Cash Bonanza in Nottingham Camera Fiasco
The Association of British Drivers today call for an end to the use of speed cameras as revenue raisers.

Trials of digital SPECS cameras on Nottingham ring road, have trapped less than 9 drivers per day, and caused embarrassment for the greedy cash grabbing scheme. The cameras were introduced following a high profile campaign by the parents of a young boy killed by a drunk driver - a misdirection of resource from the start.

Cameras on both sides of the A610 road. Click to enlarge.

The true reasons behind the installation of the cameras were shown by two Councillors quoted in the Sun. Brian Parbutt, deputy leader of Nottingham council, said:

"There was talk that this would a money-spinner, but there has been a much lower level of income from the fines"
and fellow councillor Alan Clark added:
"We may have to scale the project down slightly if the income isn't forthcoming."

ABD spokesman Nigel Humphries said, "The ABD said at the outset that these cameras were a farce, and we are delighted that they have failed to raise funds for Nottinghamshire County Council. There are a number of reasons:

a) evidence suggests that many drivers are avoiding the ringroad to avoid the traps,
b) drivers were not driving quite as fast as anti-speed zealots claimed, and
c) fortunately drivers have common sense combined with a memory."

He continues, "It is obvious that drivers in Nottingham have greatly disappointed the council, by refusing to voluntarily pay for even more of these mugging machines they have made the scheme run at a loss. Here we see the unravelling of a great lie -cameras should be about reducing accidents in known accident blackspots and not placed on safe dual carriageways for the generation of revenue.

Those with the power to abuse drivers have seen them as a cash cow, ready as ever to hand over money for driving safely, yet at a speed higher than the number dreamt up in the council chamber."

Sergeant Paul Preston, of Nottingham Police traffic management office, said in the Daily Mail:

"For reasons we don't fully understand drivers seem to be complying with the limit."

The ABD's Nigel Humphries commented "This seems a strange thing for the police to say, that they don't understand why people are obeying the law. He sounds almost disappointed - are they going to try and find ways to make sure people don't obey the law, so they'll be caught by the cameras?"

Those behind the scheme point to a drop in accident levels since the cameras were installed, but local businessman Darren Thomas said "Accidents were bound to go down - there's a lot less traffic on the ring road these days. I use other routes to avoid the cameras, so do all my friends, and it looks like a lot of other people do as well."

ABD Chairman, Brian Gregory, summed up, "This fiasco is good news for true road safety. Perhaps now the authorities will spend money more wisely, with highly visible cameras in known accident blackspots where compliance, rather than non-compliance, is demanded.

Congratulations to the drivers and councillors of Nottingham for exposing the pseudo road safety industry for what it is - greedy and ignorant!"

 

Notes for Editors